Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions Book Pdf ePub

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

by
4.5633,277 votes • 4,768 reviews
Published 07 Mar 2017
Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions.pdf
Format Hardcover
Pages63
Edition70
Publisher Knopf Publishing Group
ISBN 152473313X
ISBN139781524733131
Languageeng



From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today--written as a letter to a friend.
A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie's letter of response.
Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions--compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive--for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can "allow" women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

"Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions" Reviews

Emily May
- The United Kingdom
5
Sun, 16 Apr 2017

Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not “if only.” Not “as long as.” I matter equally. Full stop.

I honestly cannot think of any author who writes essays as equally hard-hitting and utterly readable as Adichie does. Perhaps Roxane Gay's work could be said to be as compelling, or Ta-Nehisi Coates's work to be as powerful, but Adichie always comes out on top, for me, as someone who can write about important subjects with a conversational tone that makes them pageturners.
This latest essay is a letter Adichie wrote to a friend who asked for advice on how to raise her daughter as a feminist. It touches on so many different things, from the role of fathers:
And please reject the language of help. Chudi is not “helping” you by caring for his child. He is doing what he should. When we say fathers are “helping,” we are suggesting that child care is a mother’s territory, into which fathers valiantly venture. It is not.

To self-worth, standards of beauty, and double standards:
Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.

I found it extremely powerful and moving. Adichie's style is simple and accessible and, in fact, she herself criticizes the tendency of feminists to use jargon like "misogyny" and "patriarchy" without explaining how this applies in human terms.
Even I have a tendency to write in a less personal manner about "serious" books. My tone becomes more aloof, less emotive, I think. So I'll try to take Adichie's advice and put forward my review in human, non-jargony terms: This essay really affected me personally. I got goosebumps when Adichie talked about the necessity of celebrating difference. And I felt deeply touched, even as an adult who doesn't really qualify as a "girl" anymore, by this:
“Because you are a girl” is never a reason for anything. Ever.

Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Emily
- Canada
5
Sun, 29 Apr 2018

Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.
I'm actually mad that I have to return this book to the library.
I need to own this book. The author has such a way with words. She states her opinion in a matter of fact and simple way. I wish I were able to do the same but I'll have to content myself with using her quotes!
It warms my cold dead heart to know that women like her exist out there in the world.

Nat
5
Sun, 19 Mar 2017

After having seen the scene below shared online, which was taken from this powerful short film, I immediately wanted to absorb myself in some much needed feminist literature. At which point I recalled the existence of Dear Ijeawele, which I'd gratefully received as an ARC.
*Trigger warning: rape.*
In We Should All be Feminists, her eloquently argued and much admired essay of 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proposed that if we want a fairer world we need to raise our sons and daughters differently. Here, in this remarkable new book, Adichie replies by letter to a friend’s request for help on how to bring up her newborn baby girl as a feminist. With its fifteen pieces of practical advice it goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century.
Discussing feminism, love, bodies, gender roles, marriage, rejecting likability, racism, sexism, white-privilege, privilege and inequality, body-image insecurities, female sexuality, periods, oppression, and so much more. “Where has this been all my life” was how I felt when I finished. A truly revolutionary book with a handful of innovative quotes that I'd liked to share next:
“Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not ‘if only’. Not ‘as long as’. I matter equally. Full stop.”
“But here is a sad truth: our world is full of men and women who do not like powerful women. We have been so conditioned to think of power as male that a powerful woman is an aberration.”
“Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.”
The above completely changed the way I perceive things.
“Tell her that her body belongs to her and her alone, that she should never feel the need to say yes to something she does not want, or something she feels pressured to do. Teach her that saying no when no feels right is something to be proud of.”
All of the above feels both so personally and universally relevant. And after having completed Dear Ijeawele in one sitting, I have one last thing to say: MY HEART IS SO FULL AND GRATEFUL THAT THIS EXISTS.
ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Expected publication: March 7th, 2017
Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Dear Ijeawele, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!
Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils
This review and more can be found on my blog.

jessica
- London, UK, The United Kingdom
5
Sat, 17 Nov 2018

‘your feminist premise should be: i matter. i matter equally. not ‘if only…’ not ‘as long as…’ i matter equally. full stop.’
once again, adichie is the voice of reason and the feminist icon we all deserve.
i dont annotate my books but, if i did, i can guarantee nearly every single word of truth in this tiny gem of a book would be highlighted and underlined. there is so much wisdom and significance nestled into this letter that i am of the strong opinion this should be mandatory reading for anyone and everyone.
but most of all, its a must read for all the strong women of the world - may we know them, may we be them, may we raise them. <3
4.5 stars

Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
- The United Kingdom
5
Mon, 09 Apr 2018

“Teach her to love books. If she sees you reading she will understand that reading is valuable. Books will help her understand the world, help her express herself, and help her in whatever she wants to become.”
Reading, reading is so vitally important in understanding other people and differences. It develops empathy and it makes the world a better place. We should never restrict ourselves in life, men or women, it doesn’t matter as long as we do not full victim to the silly constraints imposed upon us by society. Books help so much.
As with We Should All Be Feminists Adichie proposes positive change moving forward. However, with this also came a personal touch. This was never written to be published, but was instead a letter written to her friend (Ijeawele) offering honest advice on how to make her daughter into a feminist and a better human being.
“Teach her that the idea of 'gender roles' is absolute nonsense. Do not ever tell her that she should or should not do something because she is a girl. 'Because you are a girl' is never reason for anything. Ever.”
With it came experience and the suffering of living in a world that alters people’s minds. Growing up, Adichie and her friend had to learn the hard way. They had the pre-installed cultural mind-set that made them feel and act as if they were less than men. They felt like they could not do certain things and had to behave in “appropriate” ways. It took years for Adichie to gain the confidence to question her situation and tackle it head on. What she offers her friend in fifteen suggestions is an easier route: to grow up in a society knowing her rights.
I’ve decided that I really, really, need to read one of her novels after this. I love the message she imparts and it will be interesting to see if this carries over into her fiction.

Evgnossia
- Greece
5
Thu, 02 Aug 2018

Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not “if only.” Not “as long as.” I matter equally. Full stop.

And this is all I'm gonna mention here!
Spectacular!
Read it!

Smiliar Books of "Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions"